Budget to Build Your Own Aeroponic Garden

Aeroponic gardening—growing plants in the absence of soil—has been touted as the fastest way to grow plants since the plant obtains the nutrients that it needs to grow very easily. Here’s what you’ll need to get started.
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What is aeroponic gardening? Basically, aeroponic gardening is growing plants in the absence of soil, using nutrient-enriched air and mist. Practitioners tout it as the fastest way to grow plants since the plant obtains the nutrients that it needs to grow very easily.

Although many premade aeroponics kits are widely available, there are those who love the challenge of building their own garden from scratch.

The very idea of aeroponics is growing plants in a closed or partially closed environment, and then spraying the plants with a nutrient-rich solution. This method of growing plants emphasizes loading the plant with nutrients while reducing the incidence of diseases and pests.

To get started, you will need to get a container that will act as the housing for your DIY aeroponic garden, and also serve to keep any pests away. Look for a plastic storage bin that will serve your purpose.

High-pressure water pump

Because most high-pressure systems utilize pressures of 80 psi or more, you will need a high-pressure water pump that is capable of performing in this range. Our high-pressure pump will be capable of atomizing water to the level that we want for an effective aeroponic garden.

There are two major systems of aeroponic gardening: low pressure and high pressure. The former is beloved in the DIY community as it’s quite cheap and doesn’t require a lot of work. The latter will cost you a bit more but has the benefit of actually atomizing the water rather than misting it. By atomizing the water droplets, the plant in effect gets a more effective spray of nutrients.

You can get a professional-grade high-pressure pump capable of handling pressures of up to 100 psi online for around $70.

High-pressure water pump
$70

Accumulator tank

The basic function of a pre-pressurized accumulator tank is to ensure that the pump doesn’t have to run continuously for the entire misting/atomizing system to run continuously.

By not making the pump run continuously, you increase its lifespan while reducing your energy bill.

Accumulator tank
$80

Electrical solenoid

An electrical solenoid is a start/stop valve that controls the flow of water within the system, allowing for continuous pressure. You can grab a solenoid that is dust resistant for around $40.

Electrical solenoid
$40

Pressure switch

You will also require a pressure switch to tell the pump at what pressure to turn on or off. Please note that you do not require this unit if the pump you buy comes with a built-in pressure switch. Some pumps will come with this built in, but some will require a separate purchase.

Pressure switch
$25

Misting nozzles

The final step in creating a misting apparatus is the misters themselves. Spray misters are usually purchased in packs of six or 12. You can find hobby sites that will sell these one at a time, but buying in bulk is cheaper, and you are rarely going to need only one nozzle. For a high-pressure pump system, ensure that you get misters with a full cone construction.

Misting nozzles
$40

Tubing and piping accessories

This includes tubing and other accessories that will be used to make the whole system complete. For the tubing, you will need around 25 feet of black vinyl tubing (1” or 3/4”). Try ordering these components all at once in the same place to cut down on shipping costs.

Tubing and piping accessories
$40

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